Apple Will Replace Faulty MacBook Keyboards Free of Charge

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Under this program, if you have a MacBook or MacBook Pro with faulty keyboard, Apple will replace some keys, or if required, the entire keyboard for free. "Apple has determined that a small percentage of the keyboards in certain MacBook and MacBook Pro models may exhibit one or more of the following behaviors", the company says, "Letters or characters repeat unexpectedly; Letters or characters do not appear; Key (s) feel "sticky" or do not respond in a consistent manner". Apple also says that consumers who previously paid for a fix can contact the company to request a refund. Users with affected keyboards can take their MacBook to an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider to determine whether they are eligible.

For MacBook users experiencing issues, Apple has posted a support document on its website detailing the new keyboard service programme.

Apple has announced a list of nine models eligible for repairs, including Retina MacBooks bought in 2015 and MacBook Pros from 2016 onwards.

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Apple had created the new butterfly keyboard switch mechanism that was claimed to be 40 percent thinner than the scissor switches used in most keyboards, apart from being more stable. They will examine if the keyboard is really faulty, and replace the keyboard.

Now Apple is launching the Keyboard Service Program. The new Keyboard Service Program for MacBook and MacBook Pro is offers four years of coverage for 12-inch MacBooks 2015 to 2017 models and both 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pros and 2016 to 2017 models. As more MacBook models adopted this same keyboard design, the complaints only grew. But in the meantime, consumers can at least get keyboards that are having problems repaired at no cost-other than some of their time, of course. Jason Snell, editor of Six Colors and former editor-in-chief of Macworld magazine, wrote in April 2018, "Apple's relative silence on this issue for existing customers is deafening". Though you might face some charges if your laptop is damaged in some other way to the point that it interferes with keyboard repairs.

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