Mike DeWine wins GOP gubernatorial nomination in Ohio

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As a political scientist at Ohio State University, that's my takeaway from seeing Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray win overwhelming victories to secure their parties' nominations in the primary for governor on May 8.

By selecting Richard Cordray, the former OH attorney general and former director of the embattled Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Democratic voters made a moderate choice.

"It's like having a baby - like, am I doing this right?" she said. Republican Governor John Kasich can't seek re-election because of term limits.

"This victory happened for a reason", Cordray said, addressing all Ohioans. DeWine, the party's endorsed candidate, has walked a more careful line on Trump in anticipation of needing to win a statewide election in politically divided OH in November.

With support from conservative and Tea Party groups, Taylor pledges to support Republican President Donald Trump's agenda and to roll back Medicaid expansion. He featured Obama in his ads and campaigned with Warren. He attacked Cordray as an "establishment Democrat" willing to compromise his principles to special interests. Kucinich said he'd return the money.

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The Democratic field includes former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray, who also served six years as Ohio's attorney general, and former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich.

Democrats see opportunity in the seat being vacated by Kasich, a two-term governor and 2016 presidential contender, while Republicans hope to hold the office.

Cordray, a former OH attorney general, treasurer and solicitor general, was appointed by Obama as the first CFPB director in 2012 and resigned in November to run for governor in his home state. Joe Schiavoni, of Boardman, and former state Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill, was viewed as a beneficial public vetting for him.

Pennsylvania holds its primary May 15.

"We started as friends; we ended as friends", O'Neill said.

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