Monkey business: Chris Brown's exotic pet might land him in wahala

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Chris Brown, 28, is reportedly in trouble with the law... again. Some of Breezy's followers voiced concern about dangers of the three-year-old being next to the exotic Capuchin monkey and called up the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to report the pop star.

Last month, the R&B singer faced backlash from people on social media after Chris' 3-year old daughter Royalty was pictured holding the monkey.

The "Loyal" hitmaker could face up to six months behind bars after he was slapped with a misdemeanour charge for keeping the primate - named Fiji - at his home in California without obtaining a Restricted Species Permit from California Fish and Wildlife.

Agents executed a search warrant at Brown's home January 2, Foy said, adding that Brown wasn't there but had his employees hand over the monkey in a cage. However, a source told the site that the monkey belonged to Chris, and not his daughter's.

As for Fiji. she's fine.

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It seems that Chris has managed to bring about his latest supposed spat with the law in California, as he's not exactly been shy about publicising the fact he owns a monkey.

The monkey business comes just after Chris and singer Jacquees, 23, announced they've joined forces for a joint mixtape. While the Heartbreak on a Full Moon singer no longer has the monkey, he may be facing criminal charges and jail time.

"As I leave my office in Downtown L.A. and walk past people sleeping on the street on my way to defend people charged by the City Attorney with selling medical marijuana".

Brown's attorney Mark Geragos has since said he thought it was "absurd" of the City Attorney to 'spend taxpayer money on investigating monkey business'.

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