Intel CEO pledges "security first" following Meltdown and Spectre security issues

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Shenoy said that if the reboot issue requires a firmware update, it will be distributed through normal channels. The systems affected are running Broadwell and Haswell processors.

The good news for us, however, is that a purestrain gaming machine won't see a huge difference in DX11 performance - no matter which of the three generations of processor were used - according to Intel's results.

In the meantime, Microsoft this week said it has "temporarily paused" patches for Windows customers running AMD processors after some users reported seeing the "blue screen of death" after the update was applied.

Sys admins everywhere must patch operating systems to reduce the effects of the recently discovered Intel CPU flaws, which hackers could exploit to access speculative execution data in virtual memory and, potentially, to other VMs that share the same host or root access. Devices using the 7th Gen Kaby Lake-H mobile processors will be around 7% slower, while the performance impact on systems with the 6th Gen Skylake-S platform is estimated to be around 8%. And thanks to the efforts of hundreds of engineers, no one has apparently noticed because the fixes haven't slowed down or degraded popular services like Google search, Google Drive, and Gmail. The full details of the patch were disclosed on the tech giant's official website, but they seem to remain determined to assure their fans that at least for their GPUs, Nvidia has managed to make their device invulnerable and immune to things like Meltdown and Spectre.

HCS cancels school ahead of winter storm
Depending on the track of the low and where the best band of snow sets up, locally higher amounts are possible for some areas. The cold front dragged Thursday morning's moderate temperatures down quickly to around and below freezing temperatures.

Intel said on Thursday it would issue patches for 90 percent of the chips less than 5 years old by Jan 15 and will then focus on providing patches for the older chips.

Meltdown affects just Intel chips, while Spectre affects just about all modern chips, including AMD, ARM, IBM Power chips and Nvidia. And worse, you may not get patches at the rate you'd expect if Intel is telling system manufacturers not to issue them right now.

VMware has pledged to issue fixes at the hypervisor level, and cloud providers such as Google and Amazon say they've patched their VMs, but it's wise to patch the kernels, as well, Pereira said. The bug is also unique to Intel's patch, and other fixes for the Meltdown and Spectre, including those being pushed by Apple and Microsoft, are safe to apply.