European Union to sue Poland, Hungary and Czechs for refusing refugee quotas

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European Union nations agreed in September 2015 to help relocate the migrants from Italy and Greece and under the plan Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic were supposed to take in a combined 10,000 migrants. After having carefully analysed the explanations put forward by Hungary, the European Commission concluded that its serious concerns had not been addressed and so issued a reasoned opinion.

Last month the ECJ warned Warsaw to stop logging in one of Europe's last primeval forests "immediately" or face fines of up to 100,000 euros a day.

For Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic this legal precedent - not news, but a logical outcome.

The Commission has launched legal action against the three member states earlier this year, sending them a "Letter of Formal Notice" in June and a "Reasoned Opinion" in July.

The Commission said Thursday that the three "remain in breach of their legal obligations" and "have given no indication that they will contribute to the implementation of the relocation decision".

Their cases are being referred to Europe's top tribunal, the Court of Justice.

Following Thursday's announcement, Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis told the BBC his country would continue to oppose the relocation scheme.

Oliver, Hoffman's war of words over sexual harassment claims
He noted that the film they were gathering to discuss, " Wag The Dog ", dealt with sexual misconduct by a powerful man. That's "exactly the kind of reaction that bothers me", Oliver said, noting that Hunter "had no interest in lying".


The move shows the determination in Brussels to enforce the controversial scheme launched at the height of the migrant crisis in 2015 to share 160,000 refugees around the bloc and ease the burden on Greece and Italy. Polish Foreign Minister Witold Waszczykowski said the government was not changing its policy on migrants.

He said the quota system had fuelled anti-migrant sentiment and played into the hands of the far right.

At the core of both laws are the Hungarian government's efforts to curtail the influence of Hungarian-American financier George Soros in Hungary.

Budapest faced a triple legal whammy from Brussels on Thursday, with the European Commission also taking Hungary to the ECJ over a crackdown on education and foreign-backed civil society groups that critics say targets U.S. billionaire George Soros.

Prime Minister Viktor Orban considers Soros a key political foe, mainly due to their diverging views on migration.

The commission said Hungary's education law "disproportionally restricts European Union and non-EU universities in their operations and needs to be brought back in line with European Union law". Thus, they may dissuade people from making donations from overseas to civil society organisations in Hungary.

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