Saudi-led coalition air raid puts Yemen's Sana'a airport out of service

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The Saudi-led coalition fighting rebels in Yemen shut down the country's land, sea and air borders a week ago in response to a missile attack by the Iran-backed Houthis that was intercepted near Riyadh. While the language of the resolution calls to "increase efforts to adopt all necessary and appropriate measures to prevent civilian casualties and increase humanitarian access", it does not call for an end to US support of the Saudi-led coaltion attacking Yemen. "Seven million people are already on the brink of starvation and the blockade will only bring them closer to it".

Millions of lives were at risk because of the blockade, United Nations humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick, said to reporters in Geneva by telephone from Amman. "I think it poses a critical threat to the lives of millions who are already struggling to survive".

The UN's aid coordinator in Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick, said there was no time to wait for a new inspection system to be set up.

"The humanitarian impact of what is happening right now is unimaginable", he said.

The Houthis control most of the north, including Sanaa and its global airport, while the Saudi-led coalition dominates the airspace.

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Iran denies arming the Houthis and blames the conflict in Yemen on Riyadh.

Humanitarian agencies had been successful in preventing starvation and tackling a cholera outbreak that has sickened more than 900,000 people in six months and killed over 2,200.

Amid "the state of deadlock" in Lebanon following the resignation of its prime minister, the prelates said they were concerned that he had not yet returned to Lebanon, stressing that this was "necessary for the sake of dignity, sovereignty and stability".

The U.N. children's agency UNICEF had only three weeks of vaccine supplies left in Yemen, and both UNICEF and the World Health Organization had shipments of essential medicines and vaccines blocked in Djibouti, McGoldrick said.

Flights between Egyptian capital Cairo and Yemen's port city of Aden resumed after an 8-day hiatus, according to an official of Yemen's national flag carrier on Tuesday.

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