Houthi rebels accuse Saudi-led coalition of bombing Sanaa Airport in Yemen

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Saudi Arabia and its allies tightened a longstanding blockade of Yemen's land, sea and air borders a week ago in response to a missile fired by Houthi rebels that was intercepted near Riyadh worldwide airport.

Last week, Saudi Arabia claimed their regime was reopening the Hodeideh Port to resume humanitarian aid deliveries; however, this was short-lived and no aid was delivered to country.

But the United Nations dismissed a Saudi demand that tighter inspections be put in place at Yemen's rebel-held Hodeida port before a devastating blockade is lifted.

It said the first steps will start within 24 hours and will include the southern ports of Aden and Mukalla and the Red Sea port of al-Mokha, which are all controlled by Hadi's government.

He added: "We believe that there should be a more robust verification mechanism in Hodeidah port and we want to work with the United Nations".

The United Nations and worldwide aid organizations have repeatedly criticized the coalition in the past for blocking aid access, especially to the north, which is held by the Iran-aligned Houthis battling the Saudi-led coalition.

The United Nations has listed Yemen as the world's top priority humanitarian crisis, with more than 17 million people lacking food, seven million of whom are at risk of starvation.

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Transport minister Mourad al-Halimi had said Yemenia flights to the pro-government-held cities of Aden and Seiyun would resume on Sunday, but the national carrier said it did not have the necessary permits to fly.

The fiery comments came even as Saudi Arabia said on Monday that it will begin reopening airports and seaports in Yemen — those in areas not controlled by the rebels — after days of closing them over a rebel ballistic missile attack on Riyadh.

More than 10,000 people have been killed in the conflict, which pits the internationally recognized government, backed by Saudi Arabia and its allies, against the Houthis and forces loyal to former president Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Sammad said that with the blockade, the coalition "shut down all doors for peace and dialogue".

Some 2,000 of those deaths were the result of a cholera epidemic that swept rebel-held areas this summer, with half a million people infected.

Meanwhile, Aden's port - which is controlled by allies of Saudi Arabia - does not have the capacity, according to the United Nations, to handle the necessary volume of humanitarian cargo and would mean hazardous cross-line deliveries.

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