New £10 note features Jane Austen who regularly visited Godmersham outside Ashford

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The Jane Austen note (pictured below) becomes the second polymer - or plastic - banknote to launch in the United Kingdom, following in the footsteps of the Winston Churchill £5 note, which went into circulation earlier this year.

But the Bank of England has confirmed that a number of cash machines around the United Kingdom will have the notes.

The new tenner is made of polymer, the same plastic used int he Winston Churchill £5 note.

Austen's links to the county come through her brother, Edward Austen Knight, who was adopted by Thomas and Catherine Knight when he was 12 years old. The new ten pound note celebrates Jane Austen's work.

The new tenner features author Jane Austen and was first presented in July on the 200th anniversary of her death.

The new £10 note was released on 14 September but it could be a few days before one is handed to you as change or dispensed from an ATM. But that meant no female historical figure would appear on United Kingdom notes.

The first of the new notes will be available from the Bank of England headquarters on Threadneedle Street, London, when it opens at 9am. Austen's novels have a universal appeal and speak as powerfully today as they did when they were first published. "I am grateful to the cash industry for their support in bringing the cleaner, safer, stronger notes to the public".

The words "Bank of England" printed in intaglio (raised ink) along the top of the note.

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He added: "You can not ignore the political situation that is between India and Pakistan at the moment and the difficulties that might exist".


NOTE WORTHY Will old paper £10 notes be worth collecting once the new plastic tenner launches tomorrow?

The new £10 note features author Jane Austen, replacing Charles Darwin.

Britons should find that they stop receiving the old note in cash points and in change during this time.

These include a see-through window behind the Queen's portrait, a quill at the side of window which changes from purple to orange and Winchester Cathedral shown in gold on the front and silver on the back.

These polymer notes have courted controversy for their use of animal fat - known as tallow - in the production process.

It is also expected to last at least two-and-a-half times longer than the current paper notes.

A new plastic £20 note will be released in 2020, but there are no plans to issue a plastic £50.

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