Maduro to accept talks with Venezuela opposition

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President Maduro has agreed to open talks with the opposition party in Venezuela amid political deadlock against a backdrop of months of violent protests. "To enter into serious negotiation, we demand immediate actions that demonstrate a real willingness to resolve the national problems and not to win time".

The talks are being brokered by the former Spanish prime minister Jose Luis Rodriquez Zapatero.

No timetable was released for the proposed discussions.

Opposition lawmakers pulled out of Vatican-backed talks past year, saying the government failed to free political prisoners and prepare elections, which formed part of an agreement for dialogue.

The Dominican Republic offers its good services, the country invited both opposition and Nicolas Maduro government 's representative to explore the possibility of resuming talks that should be critically important on resolving the country's political crisis.

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Venezuela's opposition has made clear that Maduro's government must first adhere to preconditions before it would join talks. The sign of April-July period was the mass anti-government protests, more than 120 people died in protest-related violence during that time.

In August, a newly-formed constituent assembly seized power from the legislature, heightening tensions between the government and the opposition movement.

The opposition is also demanding that delayed regional elections now scheduled for October and a presidential vote slated for 2018 proceed as outlined in the constitution.

"The invitation by (Mr Medina) does NOT represent the start of a formal dialogue with the government", the coalition said in a statement.

They said any talks should be conducted with "maximum respect for the principles of democracy, human rights, social commitment and national sovereignty".

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